Cock, Andrew

Research Associate

Profile
Bibliography
Projects
  • Andrew Cock
    INSTITUTE:
    UNU-IAS
    OFFICE:
    Jingumae 5-53-70, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-8925, Japan
    E-MAIL:
    andrew.cock@unu.edu
    PHONE:
    +81 (0)3-5467-1212 ext. 1349
    NATIONALITY:
    Australia, Canada

    Research Interests

    • Economic Development and Agrarian Change
    • Globalization and the future of indigenous peoples/traditional communities/biodiversity
    • Liberalism
    • The political economy of petroleum resources and renewable energy

    Education

    • BA (Hons), Monash University
    • PhD, La Trobe University

    Biographical Statement

    Andrew Cock started working at the UNU Institute for the Advanced Study of Sustainability in July 2015. He has held postdoctoral positions in the Centre of Southeast Asian Studies, Monash University and the Institute for Advanced Studies on Asia, University of Tokyo. Prior to joining UNU-IAS he was a visiting fellow at the Research Institute for Humanity and Nature, Kyoto.

    Andrew Cock has worked extensively on environmental issues in Southeast Asia and Australia including as forestry advisor with the NGO Forum on Cambodia (2000-2004). He is a specialist on political economy and environmental change. His research activities encompass business and politics in Southeast Asia; the political economy of sustainable development; and the emerging resource constraints engendered in the interaction between the world’s agricultural and energy systems and policies aimed at mitigating climate change.

    This research agenda has resulted in the publication of the book Governing Cambodia’s forests: The international politics of policy reform, Nordic Institute of Asian Studies (NIAS) Press, Copenhagen, 2015 (forthcoming) and various articles including: “Traditional Khmer systems of forest management” (with Peter Swift), Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society (JRAS), Vol. 25, No. 1, January 2015, pp. 153-173; “Anticipating an oil boom: the ‘resource curse’ thesis in the play of Cambodian politics”, Pacific Affairs, Vol. 83, No. 3, September 2010, pp. 525-546; “External actors and the relative autonomy of the ruling elite in post-UNTAC Cambodia”, Journal of Southeast Asian Studies, Vol. 41, No. 2, June 2010, pp. 241-265; “Tropical forests in the global states system”, International Affairs, Vol. 84, No. 2, March 2008, pp. 315-33.

  • Books

    Reports